Favorable Attitude

Output indicator

Indicator Phrasing

% of [specify the target group] with a favourable attitude towards [specify the behaviour]
% de [spécifier le groupe cible] ayant une attitude favorable vis-à-vis de [spécifier le comportement]
% [určete cílovou skupinu] s pozitivním přístupem k [určete praktiku]

Indicator Phrasing

English: % of [specify the target group] with a favourable attitude towards [specify the behaviour]

French: % de [spécifier le groupe cible] ayant une attitude favorable vis-à-vis de [spécifier le comportement]

Czech: % [určete cílovou skupinu] s pozitivním přístupem k [určete praktiku]

What is its purpose?

People’s existing attitudes influence their willingness to adopt the behaviours promoted by relief and development interventions. This indicator therefore measures the proportion of the target population with a favourable attitude towards a promoted behaviour.

How to Collect and Analyse the Required Data

Determine the indicator’s value by using the following methodology:

 

1) Define a statement that can be used for assessing the respondents’ attitudes towards the behaviour. For example:

   - After the harvest, instead of burning crop residues, farmers should leave them in the fields.

 

The statements can also assess the respondents’ attitudes towards the main benefits of doing the behaviour, for example: Leaving crop residues in the fields helps increase soil fertility.

 

 

2) Conduct individual interviews with a representative sample of the target group members:

RECOMMENDED SURVEY QUESTION (Q) AND POSSIBLE ANSWERS (A)

Q1: Can you please tell me whether you strongly agree, somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, or strongly disagree with the following statement: [specify the statement]

A1: strongly agree / somewhat agree / somewhat disagree / strongly disagree / does not know

 

 

3) Count the number of respondents who replied “somehow agree” or “strongly agree”.

 

 

4) To calculate the indicator’s value, divide the number of respondents who replied “somehow agree” or “strongly agree” by the total number of respondents (exclude those who did not know) and multiply the result by 100.

Important Comments

1) Keep in mind that the fact that someone has a positive attitude towards a certain behaviour does not automatically mean that s/he will adopt it (think of the many health and other practices we all approve of but do not necessarily follow).

 

2) An alternative version of the indicator is “the average value of the [specify the behaviour] Attitude Index” – for example, “the average value of the intercropping Attitude Index”. The value of the Attitude Index is calculated by giving each response a score where the most favourable response (e.g. strongly agree) receives 4 scores, the second most favourable response (somewhat agree) receives 3 scores, the next one (somewhat disagree) receives 2 scores, and the least favourable (e.g. strongly disagree) receives 1 score. As the next step, calculate the total scores received by all respondents and divide them by the number of respondents (exclude those who did not know). The resulting number is the average value of the Attitude Index. This Index is able to record more subtle changes in the attitudes of the target group but it does not tell you the proportion of the target group members with favourable attitudes (unless you calculate this separately).

 

3) If you want your indicator to capture people’s attitudes towards several different behaviours, you can rephrase it to: “% of [specify the target group] with favourable attitudes towards at least X out of X promoted behaviours”. For example, “% of targeted farmers with favourable attitudes towards at least 3 out 5 promoted Good Agronomic Practices”. To calculate the value of the indicator, use the same methodology as described above, with the only exceptions being:

  - when analysing the data, calculate the number of respondents with favourable attitudes towards the minimum number of behaviours (e.g. at least 3 out of 5)

  - to calculate the indicator’s value, divide the number of respondents with favourable attitudes towards the minimum number of behaviours by the total number of respondents and multiply the result by 100

 

4) Measuring people's attitudes towards a certain behaviour can also be based on responses to several statements related to the same behaviour (as opposed to using just one statement as proposed above). For example, you can use 3 different statements and if the respondent is positive about at least 2 out of 3 statements, s/he can be taken as 'having favourable attitude'. 

 

5) In the statements, ask only about behaviours the respondent is likely to be familiar with (otherwise you will receive many ‘don’t know’ answers that are difficult to analyse).

 

6) If you are concerned about the data being affected by social desirability bias (respondents saying what they think you want to hear rather than what they really think), consider presenting the negative behaviour in the statement. For example: “After the harvest, farmers should burn the crop residues." In this case, the respondents who hold such unfavourable attitudes are more likely to admit to them. If you use this approach, make sure that you reverse the meaning of the pre-defined answers (strongly agree will be a negative answer; strongly disagree will be a positive answer).

 

7) The guidance on the use of this indicator was adapted from Roll Back Malaria Partnership (2014) Malaria BCC Indicator Reference Guide.

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